Month: November 2017

Autumn bonfire

This week we are clearing our garden trimmings and pruning. Its time for a bonfire!

With the bonfire pile getting larger and one of our clients wanting to take charge of tidying the bonfire area we set out to burn the bulk of what we had pruned and rake what had been left nearby into the bonfire area.

With discussions on heath and safety taken place and photos snapped to evidence for course portfolios that safety around fire is adhered to, a few pots of woodland plants were arranged along the soil bank that surrounds the bonfire area ready for planting, which will be done by other people later in the week.

Posted by Phill VWilliams, November 2017

The pruning of the vine

With having gently pruned the grape vines in the vinery last year, it was apparent that they needed a little more of a hard prune to get them into good shape. A little thinning of older stems was needed, and so having completed the summer prune and harvest of some great grapes, we enlisted the assistance of Simon, who has great experience of working with vines.

With a day of pruning and clearing of dead wood and a few tangled stems the vines are looking rather bare, but in fine fettle for seeing through the winter and making some good growth in the new year.

Posted by Phill VWilliams, November 2017

Autumn paint up!

This week has seen the paint brushes out and busy.

On Monday and Tuesday armed with brushes and gloves the potting shed front saw a rapid transformation, as the weatherboards turned from worn to black. At the same time one of our volunteers took charge of giving the three store sheds a lick of black wood stain to freshen them up and help marry them in visually to the other wooden structures in that part of the garden.

With the back garden starting to look a little more coordinated and designed, its also good to know that the wooden structures are all ready to stand up to the test of winter.

Posted by Phill VWilliams, November 2017

Winter digging…Its ‘no dig’ thanks to Simon

With some massive regeneration projects over the last year, many beds were in need of considerable work. Digging out plats, weeding and clearing as well as edges cutting in and organic matter added to the soil to revitalise the ground. Air needed to be added to the compact ground, which is where a friend of BTW stepped in. Simon popped along on a couple of days to rotorvate the large growing beds in the back part of the garden, he also rotorvated the double border prior to it being membraned and planted.

Simons energy and enthusiasm was of huge value in helping to push our planting projects along, and as a result we have had a hugely productive year of growing. Just as we have started to clear the last of this years growing beds, Simon popped past to say hello and see if we needed any rotorvating done this year.

With the double border planted up, the vegetable beds were the only two beds that needed to be rotorvated at this end of the year. These two beds are large, to dig or even fork over by hand would be a massive job. With plants cleared and annual weeds removed the beds were readied for Simons rotorvator to make light work, the result a dark brown soil looking light and airy, just in time for the winter frosts to get into the nooks and crannies and kill of any nasties that will not help our growing next year.

Simon has even offered to give the beds another go over in the spring before we plant, and has said that he can come and help with pruning the apple trees over the winter.

A massive thanks to Simon for coming in and assisting us with this huge task, your time and energy are very much appreciated.

Posted by Phill VWilliams, November 2017

The double border, time for a chop!

With us now firmly in November and the last of the colour fading from the double border, it was time to start putting the herbaceous plants to bed for winter.

With tools primed ready for the big chop, the decision was made to chop one type of plant at a time.

With it being easy to identify one plant in its many repeated planting positions, a methodical way of working was able to be achieved, which could be taken up and continued by a  namer of people working on the autumn chop over the period of a few days.

Nepeta got the chop first, then Helianthus, Asters and Chrysanthemums. With one type of plant being taken out at a time, the over all look of the border during the chop did  not look like it was half completed, more  work in progress, which given that the garden is still open to the public has allowed for the border to continue to be  pleasurable part of the garden to look at.

With many of the plants now cut down, we are waiting  mother week or so to chop the last of the remaining plants that still have a little interest. A few grasses will be left to provide a little winter interest. But to make sure things are all set up well for spring, a top up of mulch will be applied, our wheelbarrows are at the ready!

 

Posted by Phill, November 2017

Riverside Bulbs colour our spring

The hot weather of the Suffolk Show seems like a long while ago now that the cool of the autumn is upon us. but its  great time of year to start thinking about the next growing year. bulb planting of course is one of the many jobs that needs to be completed before the ground gets cold, to ensure a colourful spring.

Having met up with Sally from Riverside Bulbs last June at the show, we talked about the restoration of the walled garden and our plans. Riverside bulbs then made the offer of a few bulbs to assist us in bringing some spring colour to the garden.

Sally emailed us recently, to ask if we still wanted a few bulbs. Having then arranged to meet up, we were gifted a massive sack of daffodil bulbs, which we are all excited about planting together in the garden. There will be enough to flank the double border and thicken up an existing area in which daffodils are planted, and even plant a few specifically to use as cut flowers.

We cant wait to get the bulbs in the ground this week, and to share photos in the spring of the resultant flowers.

A massive thank you to everyone at Riverside Bulbs for their generosity.

You can look at the great range of bulbs that are on offer at Riverside Bulbs by visiting their website: http://www.riversidebulbs.co.uk

Posted by Phill VWilliams, November 2017

The double border, time for a chop!

With us now firmly in November and the last of the colour fading from the double border, it was time to start putting the herbaceous plants to bed for winter.

With tools primed ready for the big chop, the decision was made to chop one type of plant at a time.

With it being easy to identify one plant in its many repeated planting positions, a methodical way of working was able to be achieved, which could be taken up and continued by a  namer of people working on the autumn chop over the period of a few days.

Nepeta got the chop first, then Helianthus, Asters and Chrysanthemums. With one type of plant being taken out at a time, the over all look of the border during the chop did  not look like it was half completed, more  work in progress, which given that the garden is still open to the public has allowed for the border to continue to be  pleasurable part of the garden to look at.

With many of the plants now cut down, we are waiting  mother week or so to chop the last of the remaining plants that still have a little interest. A few grasses will be left to provide a little winter interest. But to make sure things are all set up well for spring, a top up of mulch will be applied, our wheelbarrows are at the ready!

Posted by Phill VWilliams, November 2017